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Welcome to the Yavapai County Regional Alert Information website!

News & Alerts

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM SUNDAY TO 5 PM MST MONDAY ABOVE 4000 FEET...

* TIMING...SNOW AND BLOWING SNOW IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE ACROSS THE YAVAPAI COUNTY MOUNTAINS...NORTHEAST PLATEAUS AND MESAS...  AND NORTHERN GILA COUNTY MOUNTAINS SUNDAY NIGHT AND PERSIST THROUGH DAY MONDAY. SNOW LEVELS WILL START OUT AROUND 6500 TO 7000 FEET SUNDAY EVENING...THEN FALL RAPIDLY BY EARLY MONDAY MORNING TO AROUND 4000 FEET DURING THE DAY MONDAY.

* GENERAL EVENT TOTAL SNOW CCUMULATIONS...AROUND 3 TO 10 INCHES OF NEW SNOW ARE EXPECTED AT ELEVATIONS MAINLY ABOVE 4000... WITH LOCALLY HIGHER SNOWFALL POSSIBLE. SNOWFALL AMOUNTS NORTH  OF PRESCOTT WILL BE LESS THAN SNOWFALL AMOUNTS SOUTH OF THE CITY CENTER...HIGHER UP IN THE BRADSHAW MOUNTAINS. SEE DETAILS BELOW OR CONSULT POINT SPECIFIC FORECAST AT:   WEATHER.GOV/FLAGSTAFF.

* SNOWFALL FORECAST FROM 5 PM MST SUNDAY UNTIL 5 PM MST MONDAY...

PAYSON 4 TO 8 INCHES
PINE-STRAWBERRY 7 TO 11 INCHES
PRESCOTT VALLEY 4 TO 6 INCHES
PRESCOTT 4 TO 6 INCHES
SELIGMAN 3 TO 5 INCHES

* OTHER IMPACTS...BLOWING SNOW IN GUSTY WINDS MAY LEAD TO WHITEOUT CONDITIONS IN NEAR ZERO VISIBILITY AT TIMES. THESE CONDITIONS WILL MAKE TRAVEL DIFFICULT.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW MEANS THAT PERIODS OF FALLING SNOW WILL CAUSE TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES. BE PREPARED FOR SLIPPERY ROADS AND LIMITED VISIBILITIES.

PLAN EXTRA TIME FOR TRAVEL...AND USE CAUTION WHILE DRIVING. FORTHE LATEST ROAD CONDITIONS AND CLOSURES...CALL THE ADOT FREEWAY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AT 1 888 411 7623 OR VISIT THEIR WEB SITE AT WWW.AZ511.COM.
Pile Burning Planned January 25-29 in the Prescott Basin

Pile Burning Planned January 25-29 in the Prescott Basin

Pile Burning Planned January 25-29 in the Prescott Basin 

Prescott National Forest fire managers plan to continue fuels treatment in the Prescott Basin. Benefits from these treatment help to reduce hazardous fuels adjacent to the wildland urban interface and increase ecosystem and community resilience. Burning of approximately 30 acres per day will start on Monday, January 25th and could continue through Friday, January 29th.


Spruce Mountain Piles – Piles are located approximately 5 miles south and east of Prescott near the community of Groom Creek (T13N, R2W, S36).

Mt Francis Piles – Piles are located approximately 4 miles south of Prescott, west of Highway 89A near Mt. Francis (T13N, R2W, S30).

Sierra Prieta Ridge Piles – Piles are located approximately 4 miles south and west of Prescott, near Sierra Prieta Overlook (T13N, R3W, S10).

Oak Knoll Piles  – Piles are located approximately 2 miles south of Prescott, east of White Spar Campground (T13N, R2W, S15).

Burning of debris left over from thinning projects require moisture in the surrounding vegetation and typically produces much lighter smoke than broadcast burning. Pile burning is one piece of the ongoing fuels reduction work in the Prescott basin.

All prescribed fires activity is dependent on the availability of personnel and equipment, weather, fuels and conditions that minimize smoke impacts as best as possible and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (www.azdeq.gov).

The public can obtain additional prescribed fire information via the following:
• Prescott NF Fire Information Hotline: (928) 777-5799
• Prescott NF Forest Website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/prescott/
• Local Ranger Stations: Bradshaw Ranger District, (928) 443-8000; Chino Valley Ranger District (928) 777-2200; Verde Ranger District (928) 567-4121

WINTER WEATHER WARNING - Take time to Prepare

WINTER WEATHER WARNING - Take time to Prepare

YAVAPAI COUNTY IS UNDER A WINTER WEATHER WARNING

As winter storms approach northern Arizona over this evening and into Thursday and Friday, primary concerns are loss of heat, power and telephone service and a shortage of supplies if storm conditions continue for more than a day. Residents should prepare by adding additional items to your emergency kits. Please read this linked document for Winter Preparedness tips.

Weather Report: SNOW WILL DEVELOP TONIGHT AND CONTINUE THROUGH FRIDAY, WITH HIGHEST IMPACTS THIS EVENING INTO TOMORROW AFTERNOON. PEAK SNOW FALL WILL BE FROM 3 AM TO 3 PM. APPROXIMATE DURATION 36 HOURS.

SNOWFALL FORECAST FROM 8 PM MST THIS EVENING UNTIL 5 PM MST FRIDAY.

o PRESCOTT VALLEY 5 TO 9 INCHES
o PRESCOTT 8 TO 12 INCHES
o SELIGMAN 4 TO 8 INCHES

OTHER IMPACTS...
- EXPECT TRANSPORTATION ISSUES DUE TO SNOW PACKED ROADS AND WINTER DRIVING CONDITIONS.
- EXPECT ENHANCED STREAM FLOWS AT LOWER ELEVATIONS OF YAVAPAI COUNTY. THERE IS NO FLOOD WARNING AT THIS TIME.
- POSSIBLE ACCESS ISSUES INTO THE BRADSHAWS AND OTHER REMOTE AREAS FOR RESPONSE.
- POSSIBLE POWER LOSS INTO REMOTE AREAS OF THE COUNTY
- ANTICIPATE HIGHEST IMPACTS TO BEGIN LATE AFTERNOON THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 2016.
SEE DETAILS BELOW OR CONSULT POINT SPECIFIC FORECAST AT: WWW.WEATHER.GOV/FLAGSTAFF

  

It's Too Late, When Told to Evacuate!

 

Winter Storm Watch for Yavapai County

Winter Storm Watch for Yavapai County

 

A winter advisory and winter storm watch has been issued for Yavapai County. Two storm systems will impact Yavapai County by Friday January 8th, 2016. Please disseminate for preparedness.

Storm 1

Timing: This afternoon into Wednesday Morning
Snow levels: above 6,000
Accumulation:
Groom Creek 3-7 inches
Walker 5 – 9 inches

Storm 2

Timing: Wednesday PM into Friday
Snow levels: Dropping to 4,000
Accumulation:
Prescott 7 to 12 inches (More in the higher elevations)
Walker 11 to 18 inches
Groom Creek 10 to 17 inches
Crown King 8 to 15 inches
Ashfork 6 to 12 inches
Seligman 4 to 9 inches
Jerome (Thursday) 2 to 5 inches
Sedona (Thursday) 2 to 4 inches

In Summary: Two significant storms are poised to impact northern Arizona. The first event will ramp up this afternoon and evening, and continue through noon Wednesday. Moderate to locally heavy snow is forecast, generally above 6000'. Please see the recently-issued Winter Storm Warnings and Advisories for the details on the forecast snow amounts and impacts.

A colder storm will hit the area Wednesday night and continue into Friday morning. Periods of moderate and occasionally heavy snow are expected, with snow levels forecast to fall to near 4000' by Thursday night. See the recently issued Winter Storm Watch for details.

This is a complex weather situation, and the details (rain/snow amounts, snow level, specific impacts) will continue to evolve with time.

Check the NWS Flagstaff website for the most up-to-date information, and be sure to call our 24hr Decision Support Hotline 928 774-4414 if you have any questions.

Sandbag and Sand Locations

Sandbag and Sand Locations

Thunderstorms can linger over any area dropping intense amounts of water in a short period of time. Your home or business could be at risk for flooding.

Anywhere it rains, it could flood. Even if an area hasn’t experienced a flood in the past, does not mean it can’t happen in the future. Flood risk isn’t just based on history; it can also be based on rainfall, topography, flood-control measures, river-flow and changes due to new construction and development.

Current sandbag and sand locations within Yavapai county: (Must fill your own – Please bring a shovel)
– Yavapai County Public Works yard in Prescott – 1100 Commerce Drive, Prescott
– Yavapai County Verde Valley Public Works yard – 4000 West Cherry Road, Verde Valley
– Prescott Fire Station – 333 White Spar Rd, Prescott
– Prescott Fire Station – 1980 Club House Drive, near the airport, Prescott
– Prescott/Central Fire Station – 1700 Iron Springs Road, Prescott
– Central Yavapai Fire Station – 4125 W. Outer Loop Rd, Prescott
– Central Yavapai Fire Station PV – 8555 E Yavapai Rd, Prescott Valley
– Williamson Valley trailhead 308 – 347 across from Granite Oaks Dr. 7 miles North of Iron Springs Rd
– Mayer Fire Station – 10001 South Miami Street, Mayer
– Black Canyon Fire Station – 35050 Old Black Canyon Hwy, Black Canyon City
– Juniper Woods – Church off Bullock Rd., Juniper Woods
– Seligman Fire – Hwy 66 and 2nd Street
– Verde Valley Fire St 31, 2700 Godard Road, Cottonwood
– Verde Valley Fire St 32, 1120 S. Page Springs Road, Cornville
– Lake Montezuma – Sycamore Park
– Lake Montezuma – corner of Beaver Creek Rd & Lookout Point Rd
– Sedona Fire – Sedona Red Rock High School – 995 Upper Red Rock Loop Rd, Sedona
– Sedona Red Rock High School, 995 Upper Red Rock Loop Road
– Sedona Uptown Public Parking Lot, 260 Schnebly Road
– Sedona United Methodist Church, 110 Indian Cliffs Road

Please view the links below for more flooding information in Yavapai County. Along with safety tips and a sandbagging handout on how to stack sandbags properly to increase their effectiveness.

Yavapai Flood Control – http://www.ycflood.com/
Sandbag Document – Sandbagging Handout
Flood insurance information, Flood Smart - https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/
Flood Preparation and Safety Handout – In English English FloodPreparationSafetyBrochure_F684_062014
In Spanish Spanish f684s_preparacion_08_08

NEVER drive through flooded roadways. STOP! Turn Around Don’t Drown.
• Vehicles can be swept away by less than 2 feet of water.
• The roadbed may be washed out.
• You can lose control of your vehicle in only a few inches of water.
• Do not drive around a barricade. Turn around and go another way!
• Other tips – BEFORE A FLOOD TIPS

To prepare for a flood, you should:
• Build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
• Elevate the furnace, water heater and electric panel in your home if you live in an area that has a high flood risk.
• Consider installing “check valves” to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home.

We highly encourage residents to sign up with the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Emergency Notification System to be notified during emergency situations at: http://www.ycsoaz.gov/community/emergency-preparedness/ens/

IT'S TOO LATE, WHEN TOLD TO EVACUATE!

Heavy Rain Possible This Fall

Heavy Rain Possible This Fall

Typical El Niño Pattern

This fall the El Nino pattern may produce heavier rains than normal, are you prepared? Only a few inches of water can create a large amount of loss. 

Know the facts:

  • Flash floods often bring walls of water 10 to 15 feet high.
  • A car can easily be carried away by just two feet of rushing water.
  • Winter storms and snowmelt are common (but often overlooked) causes of flooding.
  • New land development can increase flood risk, especially if the construction changes natural runoff paths.
  • Federal disaster assistance is usually a loan that must be paid back with interest. For a $50,000 loan at 4% interest, your monthly payment would be around $240 a month ($2,880 a year) for 30 years. Compare that to a $100,000 flood insurance premium, which is about $400 a year ($33 a month).
  • A Preferred Risk Policy provides both building and contents coverage for properties in moderate- to low-risk areas for one low-price.
  • In most cases, it takes 30 days after purchase for a policy to take effect, so it’s important to buy insurance before the storm approaches and the floodwaters start to rise.
  • In a high-risk area, your home is more likely to be damaged by flood than by fire.
  • Even though flood insurance isn’t federally required, anyone can be financially vulnerable to floods. In fact, people outside of mapped high-risk flood areas file over 20-percent of all National Flood Insurance Program flood insurance claims and receive one-third of Federal Disaster Assistance for flooding.
  • From 2005 to 2014, total flood insurance claims averaged more than $3.5 billion per year.
  • When your community participates in the Community Rating System (CRS), you can qualify for an insurance premium reduction discount of up to 45% if you live in a high-risk area and up to 10% in moderate- to low-risk areas.

Protect yourself and property!

We highly encourage residents to sign up with the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Emergency Notification System to be notified during emergency situations at: http://www.ycsoaz.gov/community/emergency-preparedness/ens/.

It’s Too Late, When Told To Evacuate!

The ABCs of Back-to-School Preparedness

The ABCs of Back-to-School Preparedness

Parents and caregivers! Disasters can strike even when your child is away at school, so it is important to have plans in place so you can connect during an emergency. Preparing your child for emergencies that may happen during the school day is as easy as A-B-C.

From wildfires to water main break, emergencies can occur with little or no warning—even during the school day. As children head back to school, take a few steps to help protect your child from an emergency and to reunite with your child quickly and safely.

There are three steps you should take to protect your child:

A: Ask how you will be reunited with your child in an emergency or evacuation;
B: Bring extra medications, special food, or supplies your child will need if you are separated overnight; and
C: Complete a backpack card and tuck one in your child’s backpack and your wallet.

To learn more, visit emergency.cdc.gov/children. You can also download and complete the Family Emergency Communication Plan now available from America’s PrepareAthon!

Creating your Family Emergency Communication Plan starts with one simple question: “What if?”

“What if something happens and I’m not with my family?” “Will I be able to reach them?” “How will I know they are safe?” “How can I let them know I’m OK?” During a disaster, you will need to send and receive information from your family.

Communication networks, such as mobile phones and computers, could be unreliable during disasters, and electricity could be disrupted. Planning in advance will help ensure that all the members of your household—including children and individuals with access or functional needs, as well as outside caregivers—know how to reach each other and where to meet up in an emergency. Planning starts with three easy steps: COLLECT – SHARE – PRACTICE.

IT’S TOO LATE, WHEN TOLD TO EVACUATE!
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Vehicle Travel Preparedness Tips

Vehicle Travel Preparedness Tips

National Preparedness month, can be summed up in one word, PREPARE. 

Vehicle Travel Preparedness Tips:

Being prepared isn’t always related to large emergency events. We can all incorporate preparedness into our everyday lives. It can be part of your check off list as we approach this holiday weekend. Adding a few extra items to your vehicles or luggage can help you and your loved ones be prepared in case of an emergency during your travels.

Emergency planning is just one small additional step in planning your trip. You know where you’re going, how you’re getting there, and when you’re coming back. To begin your emergency planning, all you have to do is imagine what emergencies might pop up along the way. A fairly likely scenario is breaking down at night on a rural stretch of road with no cell phone reception, and guess what; you’re camping for the night. No problem, if you’re prepared with a good vehicle emergency kit.

Alerts: The Red Cross provides several free emergency preparedness guide apps for iPhone and Android. While traveling, one app uses location services to tell you what county you’re in and if that county is experiencing any severe weather or emergency alerts. Other apps give tips on what to do in case of a storm, tornado, hurricane or another crisis. Visit www.redcross.org/prepare/mobile-apps for more information. Within Yavapai County make sure to sign up with Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office Emergency Notification System at: https://public.coderedweb.com/CNE/A45C10E5EC0F

Supplies:

Before you take off to travel, check the tires, check the AC. Check the spare tire and make sure it has air in it. Always carry the necessary equipment for changing a tire―a working jack, an inflated spare tire, a lug nut wrench or tire iron, and pipe for leverage. These items should always be stored in their designated place in your car’s trunk or hatchback. Check towing equipment, dragging chains will throw sparks. Never substitute parts when towing. Only use appropriate safety pins & hitch ball.

A flashlight with batteries, jumper cables, basic first aid supplies, 1-2 gallons of bottled water, snack items, a small shovel and a blanket are all useful in case you’re lost, stranded or stuck in a traffic jam. Include diapers, wipes and a change of clothes if traveling with infants or children. Always keep a cell phone charger in the vehicle so you can make emergency calls without worrying about a dead battery.

Write down important information, and keep it in a secure place. Don’t only rely on your cell phone or laptop to store your emergency contact numbers, etc. Keep a hard copy back-up on you. Always tell someone where you are doing, what route you are taking and when you plan on reaching your destination. You never know where you might be when a disaster strikes.

One item some people might not think about is a whistle. In cases where cars have gone off course and landed in ravines that aren’t visible from the road, it’s difficult to receive help if no one can see or hear them. A loud whistle carries farther than shouting voices, alerting rescuers to the location. Another useful item is a large umbrella. Not only do they protect you from the rain, but they also provide shade if you’re broken down on the side of the road on a hot day waiting for a tow truck.

Traveling emergency preparedness may not only benefit you but could also save a life another traveler. Don’t wait, Communicate. Participate in National Preparedness Month by using this holiday weekend as an opportunity to start your emergency preparedness kit and plans.

Additional CAR Recommended Items: A CAR traveling emergency kit (in addition to your personal needs) should include:

  • Jumper cables 
  • A flashlight with fresh batteries 
  • A Phillips head screwdriver 
  • A flat head screwdriver 
  • Vise grips 
  • An adjustable wrench 
  • A pair of pliers 
  • A tire inflator 
  • A tire pressure gauge 
  • Some rags and a funnel 
  • A roll of duct tape 
  • A roll of paper towels 
  • A roadside emergency card 
  • Triangle reflectors and/or flares. 
  • A pocketknife 
  • Bottled water 
  • One gallon of antifreeze 
  • A blanket 
  • Small fire extinguisher
September is National Preparedness Month

September is National Preparedness Month

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today 

September is National Preparedness Month. Sponsored by FEMA, National Preparedness Month aims to educate and empower Americans to prepare for and respond to all types of emergencies.

National Preparedness Month is a time to prepare yourself and those in your care for emergencies and disasters, both large scale and smaller local events. We know that emergencies can happen unexpectedly in communities just like yours, to people like you. To learn how you can prepare, please add http://www.regionalinfo-alert.org/to your favorites and like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/YCOEM.

Throughout the month of September we will be posting preparedness information as well as some useful links to help you get started.

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today Log into http://www.community.fema.gov/ and join the nation for National Preparedness Month.

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