Search
Search

Archived News & Alerts

Extreme Heat Warning

Extreme Heat Warning

What you should do if the weather is extremely hot:
• Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
• NEVER leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles. It is best to leave your pets at home if you can not take them in with you. Even in cool temperatures, cars can heat up to dangerous temperatures very quickly. Even with the windows cracked open, interior temperatures can rise almost 20 degrees Fahrenheit within the first 10 minutes. Anyone left inside is at risk for serious heat-related illnesses or even death. Children who are left unattended in parked cars are at greatest risk for heat stroke, and possibly death. When traveling with children, remember to do the following:
•Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are cracked open.
•To remind yourself that a child is in the car, keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When the child is buckled in, place the stuffed animal in the front with the driver.
•When leaving your car, check to be sure everyone is out of the car. Do not overlook any children who have fallen asleep in the car.
• Drink plenty of water; even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
• Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
• Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
• Postpone outdoor games and activities.
• Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
• Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
• Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
• Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
• Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
• Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.
• Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY...A LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL BRING NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS TO NORTHERN ARIZONA THROUGH THE DAY AND NIGHTTIME HOURS. RAINFALL WILL BE LOCALLY HEAVY AT TIMES WITH A
SLIGHT RISK FOR LOCALIZED FLASH FLOODING.

SUNDAY AND MONDAY...A SECOND LOW WILL EXTEND THE WET PERIOD THROUGH THE WEEKEND WITH GOOD CHANCES FOR RAIN AND THUNDERSTORMS
THROUGH MONDAY.
Heavy Rain Possible This Fall

Heavy Rain Possible This Fall

Typical El NiƱo Pattern

This fall the El Nino pattern may produce heavier rains than normal, are you prepared? Only a few inches of water can create a large amount of loss. 

Know the facts:

  • Flash floods often bring walls of water 10 to 15 feet high.
  • A car can easily be carried away by just two feet of rushing water.
  • Winter storms and snowmelt are common (but often overlooked) causes of flooding.
  • New land development can increase flood risk, especially if the construction changes natural runoff paths.
  • Federal disaster assistance is usually a loan that must be paid back with interest. For a $50,000 loan at 4% interest, your monthly payment would be around $240 a month ($2,880 a year) for 30 years. Compare that to a $100,000 flood insurance premium, which is about $400 a year ($33 a month).
  • A Preferred Risk Policy provides both building and contents coverage for properties in moderate- to low-risk areas for one low-price.
  • In most cases, it takes 30 days after purchase for a policy to take effect, so it’s important to buy insurance before the storm approaches and the floodwaters start to rise.
  • In a high-risk area, your home is more likely to be damaged by flood than by fire.
  • Even though flood insurance isn’t federally required, anyone can be financially vulnerable to floods. In fact, people outside of mapped high-risk flood areas file over 20-percent of all National Flood Insurance Program flood insurance claims and receive one-third of Federal Disaster Assistance for flooding.
  • From 2005 to 2014, total flood insurance claims averaged more than $3.5 billion per year.
  • When your community participates in the Community Rating System (CRS), you can qualify for an insurance premium reduction discount of up to 45% if you live in a high-risk area and up to 10% in moderate- to low-risk areas.

Protect yourself and property!

We highly encourage residents to sign up with the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Emergency Notification System to be notified during emergency situations at: http://www.ycsoaz.gov/community/emergency-preparedness/ens/.

It’s Too Late, When Told To Evacuate!

RSS
Copyright 2017 by Yavapai County Government Terms Of Use Privacy Statement